The Latest

Aug 28, 2014 / 50 notes

(via surpriser)


Versailles gardens from above
Aug 28, 2014 / 20,755 notes

Versailles gardens from above

(via backonthedrums)

rollership:

sciencefictiongallery: Ron Walotsky - Spaceman, 1971.
Aug 12, 2014 / 684 notes

rollership:

sciencefictiongallery: Ron Walotsky - Spaceman, 1971.

beeple:

NEON COLON (EXPLORATION)
Aug 7, 2014 / 4,274 notes

beeple:

NEON COLON (EXPLORATION)

(via the-pineal-gland)

Jul 8, 2014

To Call This A Timelapse Doesn’t Do It Justice

Tibetans’ altitude tolerance may have come from our extinct relatives
The Denisovans, relatives of the Neanderthals who inhabited Asia before modern humans arrived, are known only from a scattering of small bones and a wealth of DNA data. So far, all of that originates from a single Siberian cave (called Denisova, naturally). Like the Neanderthals, the Denisovans interbred with those modern humans once they arrived. But the modern populations who have the most Denisovan DNA are far from Siberia, occupying southern Asia and some Pacific islands.
via ArsTechnica
Jul 4, 2014

Tibetans’ altitude tolerance may have come from our extinct relatives

The Denisovans, relatives of the Neanderthals who inhabited Asia before modern humans arrived, are known only from a scattering of small bones and a wealth of DNA data. So far, all of that originates from a single Siberian cave (called Denisova, naturally). Like the Neanderthals, the Denisovans interbred with those modern humans once they arrived. But the modern populations who have the most Denisovan DNA are far from Siberia, occupying southern Asia and some Pacific islands.

via ArsTechnica

Jul 3, 2014 / 2 notes

The real planet of the apes is an island filled with wild diseased chimps released from lab experiments.

Physicists summon up their courage and go after the nature of reality.
At the very heart of quantum mechanics lies a monster waiting to consume unwary minds. This monster goes by the name The Nature of Reality™. The greatest of physicists have taken one look into its mouth, saw the size of its teeth, and were consumed. Niels Bohr denied the existence of the monster after he nonchalantly (and very quietly) exited the monster’s lair muttering “shut up and calculate.” Einstein caught a glimpse of the teeth and fainted. He was reportedly rescued by Erwin Schrödinger at great personal risk, but neither really recovered from their encounter with the beast.

The upshot is that we had a group of physicists and philosophers who didn’t believe that quantum mechanics represents reality but that it was all we could see of some deeper, more fundamental theory. A subclass of these scientists believed that the randomness of quantum mechanics would eventually be explained by some non-random, deterministic property that we simply couldn’t directly observe (otherwise known as a hidden variable). Another group ended up believing that quantum mechanics did represent reality, and that, yes, reality was non-local, and possibly not very real either.
To one extent or another, these two groups are still around and still generate a fair amount of heat when they are in proximity to each other. Over the years, you would have to say that the scales have been slowly tipping in favor of the latter group. Experiments and theory have largely eliminated hidden variables. Bohm’s pilot wave, a type of hidden variable, has to be pretty extraordinary to be real.
This has left us with more refined arguments to settle. One of these is about whether the wave function represents reality or just an observer’s view of reality.
via ArsTechnica
Jul 3, 2014

Physicists summon up their courage and go after the nature of reality.

At the very heart of quantum mechanics lies a monster waiting to consume unwary minds. This monster goes by the name The Nature of Reality. The greatest of physicists have taken one look into its mouth, saw the size of its teeth, and were consumed. Niels Bohr denied the existence of the monster after he nonchalantly (and very quietly) exited the monster’s lair muttering “shut up and calculate.” Einstein caught a glimpse of the teeth and fainted. He was reportedly rescued by Erwin Schrödinger at great personal risk, but neither really recovered from their encounter with the beast.

The upshot is that we had a group of physicists and philosophers who didn’t believe that quantum mechanics represents reality but that it was all we could see of some deeper, more fundamental theory. A subclass of these scientists believed that the randomness of quantum mechanics would eventually be explained by some non-random, deterministic property that we simply couldn’t directly observe (otherwise known as a hidden variable). Another group ended up believing that quantum mechanics did represent reality, and that, yes, reality was non-local, and possibly not very real either.

To one extent or another, these two groups are still around and still generate a fair amount of heat when they are in proximity to each other. Over the years, you would have to say that the scales have been slowly tipping in favor of the latter group. Experiments and theory have largely eliminated hidden variables. Bohm’s pilot wave, a type of hidden variable, has to be pretty extraordinary to be real.

This has left us with more refined arguments to settle. One of these is about whether the wave function represents reality or just an observer’s view of reality.

via ArsTechnica

laughingsquid:

Field Hammock, A Hammock Covered in Synthetic Grass That Combines the Natural With the Artificial
Jul 2, 2014 / 268 notes
laughingsquid:

Everyday Objects Painted to Look Like Amusing Characters
Jun 20, 2014 / 261 notes
Jun 19, 2014 / 134,387 notes
laughingsquid:

Napkin Table, A Collapsible Cloth Table That Two Diners Wear Together
Jun 19, 2014 / 207 notes
Jun 18, 2014 / 1 note
Jun 18, 2014 / 1 note

This crazy cyclist will make you pucker your asshole.

Jun 17, 2014 / 2,046 notes

nevver:

Noir Vol. 2, Marko Manev